Tuesday, September 27, 2022

IR-2022-164: IRS: Alaska storm and flood victims qualify for tax relief; Oct. 17 deadline, other dates extended to Feb. 15

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Issue Number:    IR-2022-164

Inside This Issue


IRS: Alaska storm and flood victims qualify for tax relief; Oct. 17 deadline, other dates extended to Feb. 15

WASHINGTON — Victims of storms and flooding that began on Sept. 15 in parts of Alaska now have until Feb. 15, 2023, to file various federal individual and business tax returns and make tax payments, the Internal Revenue Service announced today.

 

The IRS is offering relief to any area designated for individual or public assistance by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This means that individuals and households that reside or have a business in the Regional Education Attendance Areas of Bering Strait, Kashunamiut, Lower Kuskokwim and Lower Yukon, in Alaska qualify for tax relief. Other areas added later will also qualify for this relief. The current list of eligible localities is always available on the disaster relief page on IRS.gov.

 

The tax relief postpones various tax filing and payment deadlines that occurred starting on Sept. 15, 2022. As a result, affected individuals and businesses will have until Feb. 15, 2023, to file returns and pay any taxes that were originally due during this period.

 

This means individuals who had a valid extension to file their 2021 return due to run out on Oct. 17, 2022, will now have until Feb. 15, 2023, to file. The IRS noted, however, that because tax payments related to these 2021 returns were due on April 18, 2022, those payments are not eligible for this relief.  

 

The Feb. 15, 2023, deadline also applies to quarterly estimated income tax payments due on Sept. 15, 2022, and Jan. 17, 2023, and the quarterly payroll and excise tax returns normally due on Oct. 31, 2022, and Jan. 31, 2023. Businesses with an original or extended due date also have the additional time including, among others, calendar year partnerships and S corporations whose 2021 extensions ran out on Sept. 15, 2022, and calendar-year corporations whose 2021 extensions run out on Oct. 17, 2022. Similarly, tax-exempt organizations also have the additional time, including for 2021 calendar-year returns with extensions due to run out on Nov. 15, 2022.     

 

In addition, penalties on payroll and excise tax deposits due on or after Sept. 15, 2022, and before Sept. 30, 2022, will be abated as long as the deposits are made by Sept. 30, 2022.

 

The IRS disaster relief page has details on other returns, payments and tax-related actions qualifying for the additional time.

 

The IRS automatically provides filing and penalty relief to any taxpayer with an IRS address of record located in the disaster area. Therefore, taxpayers do not need to contact the agency to get this relief. However, if an affected taxpayer receives a late filing or late payment penalty notice from the IRS that has an original or extended filing, payment or deposit due date falling within the postponement period, the taxpayer should call the number on the notice to have the penalty abated.

 

In addition, the IRS will work with any taxpayer who lives outside the disaster area but whose records necessary to meet a deadline occurring during the postponement period are located in the affected area. Taxpayers qualifying for relief who live outside the disaster area need to contact the IRS at 866-562-5227. This also includes workers assisting the relief activities who are affiliated with a recognized government or philanthropic organization.

 

Individuals and businesses in a federally declared disaster area who suffered uninsured or unreimbursed disaster-related losses can choose to claim them on either the return for the year the loss occurred (in this instance, the 2022 return normally filed next year), or the return for the prior year (2021). Be sure to write the FEMA declaration number – DR-4672-AK − on any return claiming a loss. See Publication 547 for details.

 

The tax relief is part of a coordinated federal response to this disaster and is based on local damage assessments by FEMA. For information on disaster recovery, visit disasterassistance.gov.

 

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Tax Tip 2022-148: Tax pros can apply to be an IRS authorized e-file provider in a few simple steps

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Issue Number: Tax Tip 2022-148

___________________________________________________________

Tax pros can apply to be an IRS authorized e-file provider in a few simple steps

Over 90% of all individual federal tax returns are filed electronically. Becoming an IRS-authorized e-file provider is important for tax preparers who want to keep up with client demand and grow their business. All it takes is a few simple steps.

Tax pros need to sign in or create an account for e-services access and complete the application
The e-file application is located on the IRS.gov e-services webpage under the E-file Provider Services section. To access the e-file application, providers need to log in with an existing IRS online account or register with the IRS's credential service provider.

During the application process, providers can complete the application at their own pace. They can even save their progress and return to the application later.

To complete the application, providers will need to:

  • fill out identification information for their firm.
  • enter information about each principal and responsible official in their organization.
  • choose the e-file provider option. Return preparers who want to offer e-file to their clients should select Electronic Return Originator.

Get electronically fingerprinted, if needed
If the principal or responsible official is certified or licensed, such as an attorney, CPA or enrolled agent, they must enter their current professional status information. All other individuals will need to be fingerprinted.

The IRS recently transitioned to a new electronic fingerprinting process. Applicants must schedule an appointment with the IRS-authorized vendor for fingerprinting. The scheduling link is located on the e-file application summary page. There is no charge for this service.

Pass a suitability check
After the IRS receives the application and required information, the agency will conduct a suitability check, which may include a:

  • credit check
  • tax compliance check
  • criminal background check
  • check for prior non-compliance with IRS e-file requirements

It can take up to 45 days from the date of submission for the IRS to approve an application. Once an application is approved, the IRS will mail an acceptance letter with the preparer's Electronic Filing Identification number.


More information:
Publication 3112, IRS e-file Application and Participation.

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Monday, September 26, 2022

Cinco cosas que se puede encontrar en IRS.gov — además de información de presentación de impuestos

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Consejo Tributario del IRS 2022-147SP

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Cinco cosas que se puede encontrar en IRS.gov — además de información de presentación de impuestos

Muchas personas saben que IRS.gov tiene información de presentación y los formularios de impuestos más recientes, pero es posible que no sepan que también tiene una amplia gama de otros temas relacionados con los impuestos. Aquí hay cinco cosas que las personas pueden encontrar en IRS.gov además de la información de presentación de impuestos.

  1. Encuentre la Carta de Derechos del Contribuyente. Cada contribuyente tiene un conjunto de derechos fundamentales al tratar con el IRS. Es importante que los contribuyentes conozcan sus derechos y la obligación del IRS de protegerlos.
     
  2. Aprenda cómo solicitar el estado de 501(c)(3) (en inglés). Los requisitos y el proceso para solicitar el estado 501(c)(3) pueden ser muchos. Los seminarios virtuales y los recursos del IRS ayudan a las organizaciones a solicitar y mantener el estado de exención de impuestos federales.
     
  3. Voluntarios del IRS para la preparación de impuestos. Las personas pueden aprender a preparar impuestos y hacer una diferencia en su comunidad al mismo tiempo que se ofrecen como voluntarios para preparar impuestos gratuitamente con los programas de Ayuda Voluntaria a los Contribuyentes o Asesoramiento Tributario para Personas de Edad Avanzada.
     
  4. Manténgase al día con las últimas estafas de impuestos. Saber cómo funcionan los ladrones de identidad y los estafadores es una manera en que los contribuyentes pueden mantenerse seguros.
     
  5. Use el Asistente tributario interactivo (en inglés). Las personas pueden obtener respuestas personalizadas a sus preguntas de impuestos con el Asistente tributario interactivo. Esta herramienta brinda respuestas a muchas preguntas comunes acerca de las leyes tributarias a base de las circunstancias individuales del contribuyente.

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Tax Tip 2022-147: Five things people can find on IRS.gov - besides tax filing info

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IRS Tax Tips September 26, 2022

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Issue Number:  Tax Tip 2022-147

___________________________________________________________

Five things people can find on IRS.gov - besides tax filing info

Many people know IRS.gov has the latest filing info and tax forms, but they may not be aware that it also has a wide range of other tax-related topics. Here are five things people can find on IRS.gov besides filing info.

1. Find the Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Each taxpayer has a set of fundamental rights when dealing with the IRS. It's important for taxpayers to know their rights and the IRS's obligation to protect them.

2. Learn how to apply for 501(c)(3) status. The requirements and process to apply for 501(c)(3) status can be a lot. The IRS' webinars and resources help organizations apply for and maintain federal tax-exempt status.

3. Discover IRS tax volunteer opportunities. People can learn to prepare taxes and make a difference in their community at the same time by volunteering to prepare taxes free of charge with the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance or Tax Counseling for the Elderly programs.

4. Keep up with the latest tax scams. Knowing how identity thieves and fraudsters work is one way taxpayers can keep themselves safe.

5. Use the Interactive Tax Assistant. People can get personalized answers to tax questions with the Interactive Tax Assistant. This tool provides answers to many common tax law questions based on the taxpayer's individual circumstances.

Share this tip on social media -- #IRSTaxTip: Five things people can find on IRS.gov - besides tax filing info http://ow.ly/OiUw50KRFj1

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Friday, September 23, 2022

IRS video tax tip: Is This the Year You File Your Tax Return Electronically?

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Issue Number:  Is This the Year You File Your Tax Return Electronically?


Here is a video tax tip from the IRS:

Is This the Year You File Your Tax Return Electronically? English | Spanish | ASL | Chinese | Vietnamese

Subscribe today: The IRS YouTube channels provide short, informative videos on various tax related topics in English, Spanish and ASL.

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